NDC 62037-725 Methylphenidate Hydrochloride

Methylphenidate Hydrochloride

NDC Product Code 62037-725

NDC Code: 62037-725

Proprietary Name: Methylphenidate Hydrochloride What is the Proprietary Name?
The proprietary name also known as the trade name is the name of the product chosen by the medication labeler for marketing purposes.

Non-Proprietary Name: Methylphenidate Hydrochloride What is the Non-Proprietary Name?
The non-proprietary name is sometimes called the generic name. The generic name usually includes the active ingredient(s) of the product.

Product Characteristics

Color(s):
YELLOW (C48330)
Shape: OVAL (C48345)
Size(s):
12 MM
Imprint(s):
725
Score: 1

NDC Code Structure

  • 62037 - Actavis Pharma, Inc.
    • 62037-725 - Methylphenidate Hydrochloride

NDC 62037-725-01

Package Description: 100 TABLET, FILM COATED, EXTENDED RELEASE in 1 BOTTLE

NDC Product Information

Methylphenidate Hydrochloride with NDC 62037-725 is a a human prescription drug product labeled by Actavis Pharma, Inc.. The generic name of Methylphenidate Hydrochloride is methylphenidate hydrochloride. The product's dosage form is tablet, film coated, extended release and is administered via oral form.

Labeler Name: Actavis Pharma, Inc.

Dosage Form: Tablet, Film Coated, Extended Release - A solid dosage form that contains medicinal substances with or without suitable diluents and is coated with a thin layer of a water-insoluble or water-soluble polymer; the tablet is formulated in such manner as to make the contained medicament available over an extended period of time following ingestion.

Product Type: Human Prescription Drug What kind of product is this?
Indicates the type of product, such as Human Prescription Drug or Human Over the Counter Drug. This data element matches the “Document Type” field of the Structured Product Listing.

DEA Schedule: Schedule II (CII) Substances What is the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) CII Schedule?
The controlled substances in the CII schedule have a high abuse potential with severe psychological or physical dependence liability, but have accepted medical use in the United States. Schedule CII controlled substances include certain narcotic, stimulant, and depressant drugs.

Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Active Ingredient(s)

What is the Active Ingredient(s) List?
This is the active ingredient list. Each ingredient name is the preferred term of the UNII code submitted.

  • METHYLPHENIDATE HYDROCHLORIDE 18 mg/1

Inactive Ingredient(s)

About the Inactive Ingredient(s)
The inactive ingredients are all the component of a medicinal product OTHER than the active ingredient(s). The acronym "UNII" stands for “Unique Ingredient Identifier” and is used to identify each inactive ingredient present in a product.

  • SILICON DIOXIDE (UNII: ETJ7Z6XBU4)
  • FUMARIC ACID (UNII: 88XHZ13131)
  • HYPROMELLOSE 2208 (100 MPA.S) (UNII: B1QE5P712K)
  • HYPROMELLOSE 2910 (5 MPA.S) (UNII: R75537T0T4)
  • HYPROMELLOSE 2910 (15 MPA.S) (UNII: 36SFW2JZ0W)
  • LACTOSE MONOHYDRATE (UNII: EWQ57Q8I5X)
  • MAGNESIUM STEARATE (UNII: 70097M6I30)
  • METHACRYLIC ACID - METHYL METHACRYLATE COPOLYMER (1:1) (UNII: 74G4R6TH13)
  • METHACRYLIC ACID - METHYL METHACRYLATE COPOLYMER (1:2) (UNII: 5KY68S2577)
  • TALC (UNII: 7SEV7J4R1U)
  • TITANIUM DIOXIDE (UNII: 15FIX9V2JP)
  • TRIETHYL CITRATE (UNII: 8Z96QXD6UM)
  • FERRIC OXIDE RED (UNII: 1K09F3G675)
  • FERRIC OXIDE YELLOW (UNII: EX438O2MRT)
  • POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 3350 (UNII: G2M7P15E5P)
  • POLYVINYL ALCOHOL, UNSPECIFIED (UNII: 532B59J990)
  • AMMONIA (UNII: 5138Q19F1X)
  • FERROSOFERRIC OXIDE (UNII: XM0M87F357)
  • PROPYLENE GLYCOL (UNII: 6DC9Q167V3)
  • SHELLAC (UNII: 46N107B71O)

Administration Route(s)

What are the Administration Route(s)?
The translation of the route code submitted by the firm, indicating route of administration.

  • Oral - Administration to or by way of the mouth.

Pharmacological Class(es)

What is a Pharmacological Class?
These are the reported pharmacological class categories corresponding to the SubstanceNames listed above.

  • Central Nervous System Stimulant - [EPC] (Established Pharmacologic Class)
  • Central Nervous System Stimulation - [PE] (Physiologic Effect)

Product Labeler Information

What is the Labeler Name?
Name of Company corresponding to the labeler code segment of the Product NDC.

Labeler Name: Actavis Pharma, Inc.
Labeler Code: 62037
FDA Application Number: ANDA076772 What is the FDA Application Number?
This corresponds to the NDA, ANDA, or BLA number reported by the labeler for products which have the corresponding Marketing Category designated. If the designated Marketing Category is OTC Monograph Final or OTC Monograph Not Final, then the Application number will be the CFR citation corresponding to the appropriate Monograph (e.g. “part 341”). For unapproved drugs, this field will be null.

Marketing Category: ANDA - A product marketed under an approved Abbreviated New Drug Application. What is the Marketing Category?
Product types are broken down into several potential Marketing Categories, such as NDA/ANDA/BLA, OTC Monograph, or Unapproved Drug. One and only one Marketing Category may be chosen for a product, not all marketing categories are available to all product types. Currently, only final marketed product categories are included. The complete list of codes and translations can be found at www.fda.gov/edrls under Structured Product Labeling Resources.

Start Marketing Date: 03-04-2019 What is the Start Marketing Date?
This is the date that the labeler indicates was the start of its marketing of the drug product.

Listing Expiration Date: 12-31-2020 What is the Listing Expiration Date?
This is the date when the listing record will expire if not updated or certified by the product labeler.

Exclude Flag: N What is the NDC Exclude Flag?
This field indicates whether the product has been removed/excluded from the NDC Directory for failure to respond to FDA’s requests for correction to deficient or non-compliant submissions. Values = ‘Y’ or ‘N’.

* Please review the disclaimer below.

Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Product Labeling Information

The product labeling information includes all published material associated to a drug. Product labeling documents include information like generic names, active ingredients, ingredient strength dosage, routes of administration, appearance, usage, warnings, inactive ingredients, etc.

Product Labeling Index

Warning: Drug Dependence

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should be given cautiously to patients with a history of drug dependence or alcoholism. Chronic abusive use can lead to marked tolerance and psychological dependence with varying degrees of abnormal behavior. Frank psychotic episodes can occur, especially with parenteral abuse. Careful supervision is required during withdrawal from abusive use since severe depression may occur. Withdrawal following chronic therapeutic use may unmask symptoms of the underlying disorder that may require follow-up.

1 Indications And Usage

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are indicated for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children 6 years of age and older, adolescents, and adults up to the age of 65 [see Clinical Studies (14)]. A diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; DSM-IV) implies the presence of hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that caused impairment and were present before age 7 years. The symptoms must cause clinically significant impairment, e.g., in social, academic, or occupational functioning, and be present in two or more settings, e.g., school (or work) and at home. The symptoms must not be better accounted for by another mental disorder. For the Inattentive Type, at least six of the following symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months: lack of attention to details/careless mistakes; lack of sustained attention; poor listener; failure to follow through on tasks; poor organization; avoids tasks requiring sustained mental effort; loses things; easily distracted; forgetful. For the Hyperactive-Impulsive Type, at least six of the following symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months: fidgeting/squirming; leaving seat; inappropriate running/climbing; difficulty with quiet activities; “on the go;” excessive talking; blurting answers; can't wait turn; intrusive. The Combined Type requires both inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive criteria to be met.

1.1 Special Diagnostic Considerations

Specific etiology of this syndrome is unknown, and there is no single diagnostic test. Adequate diagnosis requires the use of medical and special psychological, educational, and social resources. Learning may or may not be impaired. The diagnosis must be based upon a complete history and evaluation of the patient and not solely on the presence of the required number of DSM-IV characteristics.

1.2 Need For Comprehensive Treatment Program

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are indicated as an integral part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include other measures (psychological, educational, social). Drug treatment may not be indicated for all patients with ADHD. Stimulants are not intended for use in patients who exhibit symptoms secondary to environmental factors and/or other primary psychiatric disorders, including psychosis. Appropriate educational placement is essential and psychosocial intervention is often helpful. When remedial measures alone are insufficient, the decision to prescribe stimulant medication will depend upon the physician's assessment of the chronicity and severity of the patient’s symptoms.

2.1 General Dosing Information

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should be administered orally once daily in the morning with or without food.Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets must be swallowed whole with the aid of liquids, and must not be chewed, divided, or crushed [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

2.2 Patients New To Methylphenidate

The recommended starting dose of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets for patients who are not currently taking methylphenidate or stimulants other than methylphenidate is 18 mg once daily for children and adolescents and 18 mg or 36 mg once daily for adults (see Table 1). Table 1. Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets Recommended Starting Doses and Dose Ranges Patient Age Recommended Starting Dose Dose Range Children 6 to 12 years of age  18 mg/day  18 mg to 54 mg/day  Adolescents 13 to 17 years of age  18 mg/day  18 mg to 72 mg/day not to exceed 2 mg/kg/day  Adults 18 to 65 years of age 18 or 36 mg/day 18 mg to 72 mg/day

2.3 Patients Currently Using Methylphenidate

The recommended dose of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets for patients who are currently taking methylphenidate twice daily or three times daily at doses of 10 mg/day to 60 mg/day is provided in Table 2. Dosing recommendations are based on current dose regimen and clinical judgment. Conversion dosage should not exceed 72 mg daily. Table 2. Recommended Dose Conversion from Methylphenidate Regimens to Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets Previous Methylphenidate Daily DoseRecommended Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets Starting Dose 5 mg Methylphenidate twice daily or three times daily  18 mg every morning  10 mg Methylphenidate twice daily or three times daily  36 mg every morning  15 mg Methylphenidate twice daily or three times daily  54 mg every morning  20 mg Methylphenidate twice daily or three times daily  72 mg every morning Other methylphenidate regimens: Clinical judgment should be used when selecting the starting dose.

2.4 Dose Titration

Doses may be increased in 18 mg increments at weekly intervals for patients who have not achieved an optimal response at a lower dose. Daily dosages above 54 mg in children and 72 mg in adolescents have not been studied and are not recommended. Daily dosages above 72 mg in adults are not recommended.A 27 mg dosage strength is available for physicians who wish to prescribe between the 18 mg and 36 mg dosages.

2.5 Maintenance/Extended Treatment

There is no body of evidence available from controlled trials to indicate how long the patient with ADHD should be treated with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release. It is generally agreed, however, that pharmacological treatment of ADHD may be needed for extended periods.The effectiveness of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release for long-term use, i.e., for more than 7 weeks, has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials. The physician who elects to use methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release for extended periods in patients with ADHD should periodically re-evaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient with trials off medication to assess the patient’s functioning without pharmacotherapy. Improvement may be sustained when the drug is either temporarily or permanently discontinued.

2.6 Dose Reduction And Discontinuation

If paradoxical aggravation of symptoms or other adverse events occur, the dosage should be reduced, or, if necessary, the drug should be discontinued. If improvement is not observed after appropriate dosage adjustment over a one-month period, the drug should be discontinued.

3 Dosage Forms And Strengths

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets, USP are available in the following dosage strengths: 18 mg – Each yellow, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 725 on one side and plain on the other side contains 18 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. 27 mg – Each gray, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 734 on one side and plain on the other side contains 27 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. 36 mg – Each white, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 726 on one side and plain on the other side contains 36 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. 54 mg – Each red brown, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 727 on one side and plain on the other side contains 54 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP.

4.1 Hypersensitivity To Methylphenidate

Hypersensitivity reactions, such as angioedema and anaphylactic reactions, have been observed in patients treated with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Therefore, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to methylphenidate or other components of the product [see Adverse Reactions (6.6)].

4.2 Agitation

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are contraindicated in patients with marked anxiety, tension, and agitation, since the drug may aggravate these symptoms.

4.3 Glaucoma

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are contraindicated in patients with glaucoma.

4.4 Tics

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are contraindicated in patients with motor tics or with a family history or diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome [see Adverse Reactions (6.4)].

4.5 Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are contraindicated during treatment with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, and also within a minimum of 14 days following discontinuation of a MAO inhibitor (hypertensive crises may result) [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

5.1 Serious Cardiovascular Events

Sudden Death and Pre-existing Structural Cardiac Abnormalities or Other Serious Heart Problems

5.3 Seizures

There is some clinical evidence that stimulants may lower the convulsive threshold in patients with prior history of seizures, in patients with prior EEG abnormalities in absence of seizures, and, very rarely, in patients without a history of seizures and no prior EEG evidence of seizures. In the presence of seizures, the drug should be discontinued.

5.4 Priapism

Prolonged and painful erections, sometimes requiring surgical intervention, have been reported with methylphenidate products, including methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets, in both pediatric and adult patients [see Adverse Reactions (6.6)]. Priapism was not reported with drug initiation but developed after some time on the drug, often subsequent to an increase in dose. Priapism has also appeared during a period of drug withdrawal (drug holidays or during discontinuation). Patients who develop abnormally sustained or frequent and painful erections should seek immediate medical attention.

5.5 Peripheral Vasculopathy, Including Raynaud’S Phenomenon

Stimulants, including methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release, used to treat ADHD are associated with peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon. Signs and symptoms are usually intermittent and mild; however, very rare sequelae include digital ulceration and/or soft tissue breakdown. Effects of peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon, were observed in postmarketing reports at different times and at therapeutic doses in all age groups throughout the course of treatment. Signs and symptoms generally improve after reduction in dose or discontinuation of drug. Careful observation for digital changes is necessary during treatment with ADHD stimulants. Further clinical evaluation (e.g., rheumatology referral) may be appropriate for certain patients.

5.6 Long-Term Suppression Of Growth

Careful follow-up of weight and height in children ages 7 to 10 years who were randomized to either methylphenidate or non-medication treatment groups over 14 months, as well as in naturalistic subgroups of newly methylphenidate-treated and non-medication-treated children over 36 months (to the ages of 10 to 13 years), suggests that consistently medicated children (i.e., treatment for 7 days per week throughout the year) have a temporary slowing in growth rate (on average, a total of about 2 cm less growth in height and 2.7 kg less growth in weight over 3 years), without evidence of growth rebound during this period of development. Published data are inadequate to determine whether chronic use of amphetamines may cause similar suppression of growth; however, it is anticipated that they likely have this effect as well. Therefore, growth should be monitored during treatment with stimulants, and patients who are not growing or gaining height or weight as expected may need to have their treatment interrupted.

5.7 Visual Disturbance

Difficulties with accommodation and blurring of vision have been reported with stimulant treatment.

5.8 Potential For Gastrointestinal Obstruction

Since methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets may retain their shape or marginally deform in the GI tract, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should not ordinarily be administered to patients with pre-existing severe gastrointestinal narrowing (pathologic or iatrogenic, for example: esophageal motility disorders, small bowel inflammatory disease, “short gut” syndrome due to adhesions or decreased transit time, past history of peritonitis, cystic fibrosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, or Meckel’s diverticulum). There have been rare reports of obstructive symptoms in patients with known strictures in association with the ingestion of drugs in nondeformable controlled-release formulations. Due to the controlled-release design of the tablet, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should be used only in patients who are able to swallow the tablet whole [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

5.9 Hematologic Monitoring

Periodic CBC, differential, and platelet counts are advised during prolonged therapy.

6 Adverse Reactions

  • The following are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling: Drug Dependence [see Box Warning]Hypersensitivity to Methylphenidate [see Contraindications (4.1)]Agitation [see Contraindications (4.2)]Glaucoma [see Contraindications (4.3)]Tics [see Contraindications (4.4)]Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors [see Contraindications (4.5) and Drug Interactions (7.1)]Serious Cardiovascular Events [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]Psychiatric Adverse Events [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]Seizures [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]Priapism [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]
  • Long-Term Suppression of Growth [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)]Visual Disturbance [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)]Potential for Gastrointestinal Obstruction [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)]Hematologic Monitoring [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)]The most common adverse reaction in double-blind clinical trials (greater than 5%) in pediatric patients (children and adolescents) was abdominal pain upper. The most common adverse reactions in double-blind clinical trials (greater than 5%) in adult patients were decreased appetite, headache, dry mouth, nausea, insomnia, anxiety, dizziness, weight decreased, irritability, and hyperhidrosis [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. The most common adverse reactions associated with discontinuation (greater than or equal to 1%) from either pediatric or adult clinical trials were anxiety, irritability, insomnia, and blood pressure increased [see Adverse Reactions (6.3)]. The development program for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets included exposures in a total of 3906 participants in clinical trials. Children, adolescents, and adults with ADHD were evaluated in 6 controlled clinical studies and 11 open-label clinical studies (see Table 3). Safety was assessed by collecting adverse events, vital signs, weights, and ECGs, and by performing physical examinations and laboratory analyses. Table 3. Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets Exposure in Double-Blind and Open-Label Clinical Studies Patient Population N Dose Range Children  2216  18 to 54 mg once daily  Adolescents  502  18 to 72 mg once daily  Adults  1188 18 to 108 mg once daily Adverse events during exposure were obtained primarily by general inquiry and recorded by clinical investigators using their own terminology. Consequently, to provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of individuals experiencing adverse events, events were grouped in standardized categories using MedDRA terminology. The stated frequencies of adverse events represent the proportion of individuals who experienced, at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse event of the type listed. An event was considered treatment-emergent if it occurred for the first time or worsened while receiving therapy following baseline evaluation. Throughout this section, adverse reactions are reported. Adverse reactions are adverse events that were considered to be reasonably associated with the use of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release based on the comprehensive assessment of the available adverse event information. A causal association for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release often cannot be reliably established in individual cases. Further, because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice.The majority of adverse reactions were mild to moderate in severity.

6.1 Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions In Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

Adverse reactions in either the pediatric or adult double-blind adverse reactions tables may be relevant for both patient populations.

6.2 Other Adverse Reactions Observed In Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets Clinical Trials

This section includes adverse reactions reported by methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets-treated subjects in double-blind trials that do not meet the criteria specified for Table 4 or Table 5 and all adverse reactions reported by methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets-treated subjects who participated in open-label and postmarketing clinical trials.Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: Leukopenia
Eye Disorders: Accommodation disorder, Dry eye
Vascular Disorders: Hot flush
Gastrointestinal Disorders: Abdominal discomfort, Abdominal pain, Diarrhea
General Disorders and Administrative Site Conditions: Asthenia, Fatigue, Feeling jittery, Thirst
Infections and Infestations: Sinusitis
Investigations: Alanine aminotransferase increased, Blood pressure increased, Cardiac murmur, Heart rate increased
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: Muscle spasms 
Nervous System Disorders: Lethargy, Psychomotor hyperactivity, Somnolence
Psychiatric Disorders: Anger, Hypervigilance, Mood altered, Mood swings, Panic attack, Sleep disorder, Tearfulness, Tic
Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: Erectile dysfunction
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: Dyspnea
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Rash, Rash macular
Vascular Disorders: Hypertension

6.3 Discontinuation Due To Adverse Reactions

Adverse reactions in the 4 placebo-controlled studies of children and adolescents leading to discontinuation occurred in 2 methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets patients (0.6%) including depressed mood (1, 0.3%) and headache and insomnia (1, 0.3%), and 6 placebo patients (1.9%) including headache and insomnia (1, 0.3%), irritability (2, 0.6%), headache (1, 0.3%), psychomotor hyperactivity (1, 0.3%), and tic (1, 0.3%).In the 2 placebo-controlled studies of adults, 25 methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets patients (6.0%) and 6 placebo patients (2.8%) discontinued due to an adverse reaction. Those events with an incidence of greater than 0.5% in the methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets patients included anxiety (1.7%), irritability (1.4%), blood pressure increased (1.0%), and nervousness (0.7%). In placebo patients, blood pressure increased and depressed mood had an incidence of greater than 0.5% (0.9%). In the 11 open-label studies of children, adolescents, and adults, 266 methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets patients (7.0%) discontinued due to an adverse reaction. Those events with an incidence of greater than 0.5% included insomnia (1.2%), irritability (0.8%), anxiety (0.7%), decreased appetite (0.7%), and tic (0.6%).

6.4 Tics

In a long-term uncontrolled study (n=432 children), the cumulative incidence of new onset of tics was 9% after 27 months of treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets.In a second uncontrolled study (n=682 children) the cumulative incidence of new-onset tics was 1% (9/682 children). The treatment period was up to 9 months with mean treatment duration of 7.2 months.

6.5 Blood Pressure And Heart Rate Increases

In the laboratory classroom clinical trials in children (Studies 1 and 2), both methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release once daily and methylphenidate three times daily increased resting pulse by an average of 2 to 6 bpm and produced average increases of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of roughly 1 to 4 mm Hg during the day, relative to placebo. In the placebo-controlled adolescent trial (Study 4), mean increases from baseline in resting pulse rate were observed with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release and placebo at the end of the double-blind phase (5 and 3 beats/minute, respectively). Mean increases from baseline in blood pressure at the end of the double-blind phase for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release and placebo-treated patients were 0.7 and 0.7 mm Hg (systolic) and 2.6 and 1.4 mm Hg (diastolic), respectively. In one placebo-controlled study in adults (Study 6), dose-dependent mean increases of 3.9 to 9.8 bpm from baseline in standing pulse rate were observed with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release at the end of the double-blind treatment vs. an increase of 2.7 beats/minute with placebo. Mean changes from baseline in standing blood pressure at the end of double-blind treatment ranged from 0.1 to 2.2 mm Hg (systolic) and -0.7 to 2.2 mm Hg (diastolic) for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release and was 1.1 mm Hg (systolic) and -1.8 mm Hg (diastolic) for placebo. In a second placebo-controlled study in adults (Study 5), mean changes from baseline in resting pulse rate were observed for methylphenidate hydrochloride  extended-release and placebo at the end of the double-blind treatment (3.6 and –1.6 beats/minute, respectively). Mean changes from baseline in blood pressure at the end of the double–blind treatment for methylphenidate hydrochloride  extended-release and placebo-treated patients were –1.2 and –0.5 mm Hg (systolic) and 1.1 and 0.4 mm Hg (diastolic), respectively [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

6.6 Postmarketing Experience

The following additional adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency:Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: Pancytopenia, Thrombocytopenia, Thrombocytopenic purpura Cardiac Disorders: Angina pectoris, Bradycardia, Extrasystoles, Supraventricular tachycardia, Ventricular extrasystoles Eye Disorders: Diplopia, Mydriasis, Visual impairmentGeneral Disorders: Chest pain, Chest discomfort, Drug effect decreased, Hyperpyrexia, Therapeutic response decreasedHepatobiliary disorders: Hepatocellular injury, Acute hepatic failureImmune System Disorders: Hypersensitivity reactions such as Angioedema, Anaphylactic reactions, Auricular swelling, Bullous conditions, Exfoliative conditions, Urticarias, Pruritus NEC, Rashes, Eruptions, and Exanthemas NEC Investigations: Blood alkaline phosphatase increased, Blood bilirubin increased, Hepatic enzyme increased, Platelet count decreased, White blood cell count abnormal Musculoskeletal, Connective Tissue and Bone Disorders: Arthralgia, Myalgia, Muscle twitching, Rhabdomyolysis  Nervous System Disorders: Convulsion, Grand mal convulsion, Dyskinesia, Serotonin syndrome in combination with serotonergic drugs Psychiatric Disorders: Disorientation, Hallucination, Hallucination auditory, Hallucination visual, Mania, Logorrhea, Libido changesReproductive System and Breast Disorders: PriapismSkin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Alopecia, Erythema Vascular Disorders: Raynaud's phenomenon

7.1 Mao Inhibitors

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release should not be used in patients being treated (currently or within the preceding 2 weeks) with MAO inhibitors [see Contraindications (4.5)].

7.2 Vasopressor Agents

Because of possible increases in blood pressure, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release should be used cautiously with vasopressor agents [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

7.3 Coumarin Anticoagulants, Antidepressants, And Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

Human pharmacologic studies have shown that methylphenidate may inhibit the metabolism of coumarin anticoagulants, anticonvulsants (e g , phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone), and some antidepressants (tricyclics and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Downward dose adjustment of these drugs may be required when given concomitantly with methylphenidate. It may be necessary to adjust the dosage and monitor plasma drug concentrations (or, in the case of coumarin, coagulation times), when initiating or discontinuing concomitant methylphenidate.

8.2 Labor And Delivery

The effect of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release on labor and delivery in humans is unknown.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether methylphenidate is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised if methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release is administered to a nursing woman. In lactating female rats treated with a single oral dose of 5 mg/kg radiolabeled methylphenidate, radioactivity (representing methylphenidate and/or its metabolites) was observed in milk and levels were generally similar to those in plasma.

8.4 Pediatric Use

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release should not be used in children under six years, since safety and efficacy in this age group have not been established. Long-term effects of methylphenidate in children have not been well established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets have not been studied in patients greater than 65 years of age.

9.1 Controlled Substance

Methylphenidate is a Schedule II controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act.

9.2 Abuse

As noted in the Box Warning, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should be given cautiously to patients with a history of drug dependence or alcoholism. Chronic abusive use can lead to marked tolerance and psychological dependence with varying degrees of abnormal behavior.  Frank psychotic episodes can occur, especially with parenteral abuse.In two placebo-controlled human abuse potential studies, single oral doses of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets were compared to single oral doses of immediate-release methylphenidate (IR MPH) and placebo in subjects with a history of recreational stimulant use to assess relative abuse potential. For the purpose of this assessment, the response for each of the subjective measures was defined as the maximum effect within the first 8 hours after dose administration.In one study (n=40), both methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (108 mg) and 60 mg IR MPH compared to placebo produced statistically significantly greater responses on the five subjective measures suggestive of abuse potential. In comparisons between the two active treatments, however, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (108 mg) produced variable responses on positive subjective measures that were either statistically indistinguishable from (Abuse Potential, Drug Liking, Amphetamine, and Morphine Benzedrine Group [Euphoria]) or statistically less than (Stimulation – Euphoria) responses produced by 60 mg IR MPH.In another study (n=49), both doses of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (54 mg and 108 mg) and both doses of  IR MPH (50 mg and 90 mg) produced statistically significantly greater responses compared to placebo on the two primary scales used in the study (Drug Liking, Euphoria). When doses of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (54 mg and 108 mg) were compared to IR MPH (50 mg and 90 mg), respectively, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets produced statistically significantly lower subjective responses on these two scales than IR MPH. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (108 mg) produced responses that were statistically indistinguishable from the responses on these two scales produced by IR MPH (50 mg). Differences in subjective responses to the respective doses should be considered in the context that only 22% of the total amount of methylphenidate in methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets is available for immediate release from the drug overcoat [see System Components and Performance (11.1)].Although these findings reveal a relatively lower response to methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets on subjective measures suggestive of abuse potential compared to IR MPH at roughly equivalent total MPH doses, the relevance of these findings to the abuse potential of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets in the community is unknown.

9.3 Dependence

As noted in the Box Warning, careful supervision is required during withdrawal from abusive use since severe depression may occur.  Withdrawal following chronic therapeutic use may unmask symptoms of the underlying disorder that may require follow-up.

10.1 Signs And Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of methylphenidate hydrochloride overdosage, resulting principally from overstimulation of the CNS and from excessive sympathomimetic effects, may include the following: vomiting, agitation, muscle twitching, convulsion, grand mal convulsion, confusional state, hallucinations (auditory and/or visual), hyperhidrosis, headache, pyrexia, tachycardia, palpitations, heart rate increased, sinus arrhythmia, hypertension, rhabdomyolysis, mydriasis, and dry mouth.

Treatment consists of appropriate supportive measures. The patient must be protected against self-injury and against external stimuli that would aggravate overstimulation already present. Gastric contents may be evacuated by gastric lavage as indicated. Before performing gastric lavage, control agitation and seizures if present and protect the airway. Other measures to detoxify the gut include administration of activated charcoal and a cathartic. Intensive care must be provided to maintain adequate circulation and respiratory exchange; external cooling procedures may be required for pyrexia.
Efficacy of peritoneal dialysis or extracorporeal hemodialysis for methylphenidate hydrochloride overdosage has not been established. The prolonged release of methylphenidate from methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should be considered when treating patients with overdose.

10.3 Poison Control Center

As with the management of all overdosage, the possibility of multiple-drug ingestion should be considered. The physician may wish to consider contacting a poison control center for up-to-date information on the management of overdosage with methylphenidate.

11 Description

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets USP are a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets USP are available in four tablet strengths. Each extended-release tablet for once-a-day oral administration contains 18 mg, 27 mg, 36 mg, or 54 mg of methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP and is designed to have a 12-hour duration of effect. Chemically, methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP is d,l (racemic) methyl α-phenyl-2-piperidineacetate hydrochloride. Its molecular formula is C14H19NO2•HCl. Its structural formula is: Methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP is a white, odorless crystalline powder. Its solutions are acid to litmus. It is freely soluble in water and in methanol, soluble in alcohol, and slightly soluble in chloroform and in acetone. Its molecular weight is 269.77. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets USP also contain the following inert ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, fumaric acid, hypromellose 2208, hypromellose 2910, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer Type A, methacrylic acid copolymer Type B, talc, titanium dioxide, and triethyl citrate. The 18 mg strength also contains iron oxide red, iron oxide yellow, polyethylene glycol 3350, and polyvinyl alcohol. The 27 mg strength also contains FD&C Blue #2/Indigo Carmine Aluminum Lake, iron oxide black, iron oxide yellow, polyethylene glycol 3350, and polyvinyl alcohol. The 36 mg strength also contains triacetin. The 54 mg strength also contains iron oxide red, polyethylene glycol 3350, and polyvinyl alcohol. The imprinting ink contains ammonium hydroxide, iron oxide black, propylene glycol, and shellac.USP drug release testing pending.

11.1 System Components And Performance

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets deliver methylphenidate hydrochloride at a controlled rate. The system is comprised of a hydrogel matrix extended-release core with a delayed-release coating surrounded by an immediate-release drug overcoat. In an aqueous environment, such as the gastrointestinal tract, the drug overcoat dissolves within one hour, providing an initial dose of methylphenidate. Both the delayed-release coating and the inner hydrogel matrix control drug release from the tablet core. The delayed-release coating slowly erodes upon exposure to the gastrointestinal tract to allow drug release from the hydrogel matrix core.  Furthermore, the drug release rate from the system increases with time over a period of 6 to 7 hours due to the erosion of the delayed release coating resulting in increased exposure of the hydrogel matrix to fluids. The biologically inert components of the tablet may remain almost intact during gastrointestinal transit and may be eliminated in the stool in a form that may look like a tablet comprising of insoluble components. It is possible that methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets may be visible on abdominal x-rays under certain circumstances, especially when digital enhancing techniques are utilized.

12.1 Mechanism Of Action

Methylphenidate hydrochloride is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. The mode of therapeutic action in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is not known. Methylphenidate is thought to block the reuptake of norepinephrine and dopamine into the presynaptic neuron and increase the release of these monoamines into the extraneuronal space.

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

Methylphenidate is a racemic mixture comprised of the d- and l-isomers. The d-isomer is more pharmacologically active than the l-isomer.

14 Clinical Studies

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets was demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in 4 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in children and adolescents and 2 double-blind placebo-controlled studies in adults who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for ADHD.

14.1 Children

Three double-blind, active- and placebo-controlled studies were conducted in 416 children aged 6 to 12 years. The controlled studies compared methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets given once daily (18, 36, or 54 mg), methylphenidate given three times daily over 12 hours (15, 30, or 45 mg total daily dose), and placebo in two single-center, 3-week crossover studies (Studies 1 and 2) and in a multicenter, 4-week, parallel-group comparison (Study 3). The primary comparison of interest in all three trials was methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release  tablets versus placebo. Symptoms of ADHD were evaluated by community schoolteachers using the Inattention/Overactivity with Aggression (IOWA) Conners scale. Statistically significant reduction in the Inattention/Overactivity subscale versus placebo was shown consistently across all three controlled studies for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. The scores for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets and placebo for the three studies are presented in Figure 2.Figure 2. Mean Community School Teacher IOWA Conners Inattention/Overactivity Scores with Methylphenidate Hydrochloride Extended-Release Tablets Once-Daily (18, 36, or 54 mg) and placebo. Studies 1 and 2 involved a 3-way crossover of 1 week per treatment arm. Study 3 involved 4 weeks of parallel-group treatments with a Last Observation Carried Forward analysis at week 4. Error bars represent the mean plus standard error of the mean. In Studies 1 and 2, symptoms of ADHD were evaluated by laboratory schoolteachers using the SKAMP* laboratory school rating scale. The combined results from these two studies demonstrated statistically significant improvements in attention and behavior in patients treated with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets versus placebo that were maintained through 12 hours after dosing. Figure 3 presents the laboratory schoolteacher SKAMP ratings for methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets and placebo.*Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Fynn, and PelhamFigure 3. Laboratory School Teacher SKAMP Ratings: Mean (SEM) of Combined Attention (Studies 1 and 2)

14.2 Adolescents

In a randomized, double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled trial (Study 4) involving 177 patients, methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets was demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of ADHD in adolescents aged 13 to 18 years at doses up to 72 mg/day (1.4 mg/kg/day). Of 220 patients who entered an open 4-week titration phase, 177 were titrated to an individualized dose (maximum of 72 mg/day) based on meeting specific improvement criteria on the ADHD Rating Scale and the Global Assessment of Effectiveness with acceptable tolerability. Patients who met these criteria were then randomized to receive either their individualized dose of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets (18 mg/day to 72 mg/day, n=87) or placebo (n=90) during a two-week double-blind phase. At the end of this phase, mean scores for the investigator rating on the ADHD Rating Scale demonstrated that methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets was statistically significantly superior to placebo.

14.3  Adults

Two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in 627 adults aged 18 to 65 years. The controlled studies compared methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets administered once daily and placebo in a multicenter, parallel-group, 7-week dose-titration study (Study 5) (36 mg/day to 108 mg/day) and in a multicenter, parallel-group, 5-week, fixed-dose study (Study 6) (18, 36, and 72 mg/day). Study 5 demonstrated the effectiveness of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets in the treatment of ADHD in adults aged 18 to 65 years at doses from 36 mg/day to 108 mg/day based on the change from baseline to final study visit on the Adult ADHD Investigator Rating Scale (AISRS). Of 226 patients who entered the 7-week trial, 110 were randomized to methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets and 116 were randomized to placebo. Treatment was initiated at 36 mg/day and patients continued with incremental increases of 18 mg/day (36 mg/day to 108 mg/day) based on meeting specific improvement criteria with acceptable tolerability. At the final study visit, mean change scores (LS Mean, SEM) for the investigator rating on the AISRS demonstrated that methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets was statistically significantly superior to placebo. Study 6 was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-response study (5-week duration) with 3 fixed-dose groups (18, 36, and 72 mg). Patients were randomized to receive methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets administered at doses of 18 mg (n=101), 36 mg (n=102), 72 mg/day (n=102), or placebo (n=96). All three doses of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release were statistically significantly more effective than placebo in improving CAARS (Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scale) total scores at double-blind end point in adult subjects with ADHD.

15 References

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994.

16 How Supplied/Storage And Handling

Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets USP are available as follows:18 mg – Each yellow, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 725 on one side and plain on the other side contains 18 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. Tablets are supplied in bottles of 100 (NDC 62037-725-01).27 mg – Each gray, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 734 on one side and plain on the other side contains 27 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. Tablets are supplied in bottles of 100 (NDC 62037-734-01).36 mg – Each white, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 726 on one side and plain on the other side contains 36 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. Tablets are supplied in bottles of 100 (NDC 62037-726-01).54 mg – Each red brown, film-coated, capsule shaped tablet imprinted with the Andrx logo and 727 on one side and plain on the other side contains 54 mg methylphenidate hydrochloride, USP. Tablets are supplied in bottles of 100 (NDC 62037-727-01).

17 Patient Counseling Information

See Medication Guide

Medication Guide

  • Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (meth" il fen' i date hye" droe klor' ide)Extended-Release Tablets USP    CIIRead the Medication Guide that comes with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets before you or your child starts taking it and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This Medication Guide does not take the place of talking to your doctor about your or your child's treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. What is the most important information I should know about methylphenidate hydrochloride? The following have been reported with use of methylphenidate hydrochloride and other stimulant medicines: 1. Heart-related problems: sudden death in patients who have heart problems or heart defects  stroke and heart attack in adults  increased blood pressure and heart rate  Tell your doctor if you or your child has any heart problems, heart defects, high blood pressure, or a family history of these problems. Your doctor should check you or your child carefully for heart problems before starting methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Your doctor should check your or your child’s blood pressure and heart rate regularly during treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Call your doctor right away if you or your child has any signs of heart problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets.2. Mental (Psychiatric) problems: All Patients new or worse behavior and thought problems new or worse bipolar illness  new or worse aggressive behavior or hostility Children and Teenagers new psychotic symptoms (such as hearing voices, believing things that are not true, are suspicious) or new manic symptoms  Tell your doctor about any mental problems you or your child have, or about a family history of suicide, bipolar illness, or depression. Call your doctor right away if you or your child has any new or worsening mental symptoms or problems while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets, especially seeing or hearing things that are not real, believing things that are not real, or are suspicious.3. Painful and prolonged erections (priapism)Painful and prolonged erections (priapism) have occurred with methylphenidate. If you or your child develop priapism, seek medical help right away. Because of the potential for lasting damage, priapism should be evaluated by a doctor immediately.4. Circulation problems in fingers and toes[Peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon]:fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful fingers or toes may change color from pale, to blue, to redTell your doctor if you have or your child has numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in your fingers or toes.Call your doctor right away if you have or your child has any signs of unexplained wounds appearing on fingers or toes while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets.What are methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets?Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are a central nervous system stimulant prescription medicine. It is used for the treatment of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets may help increase attention and decrease impulsiveness and hyperactivity in patients with ADHD. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should be used as a part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include counseling or other therapies.Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are a federally controlled substance (CII) because they can be abused or lead to dependence. Keep methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets may harm others, and is against the law.Tell your doctor if you or your child has (or has a family history of) ever abused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription medicines, or street drugs.Who should not take methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets?Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should not be taken if you or your child:is very anxious, tense, or agitated has an eye problem called glaucoma has tics or Tourette's syndrome, or a family history of Tourette's syndrome. Tics are hard-to-control repeated movements or sounds. is taking or has taken within the past 14 days an antidepression medicine called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor or MAOI. is allergic to anything in methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. See the end of this Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets should not be used in children less than 6 years old because it has not been studied in this age group. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets may not be right for you or your child. Before starting methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets tell your or your child's doctor about all health conditions (or a family history of) including:heart problems, heart defects, or high blood pressure mental problems including psychosis, mania, bipolar illness, or depression tics or Tourette's syndrome seizures or have had an abnormal brain wave test (EEG)circulation problems in fingers and toes esophagus, stomach, or small or large intestine problems Tell your doctor if you or your child is pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breastfeeding. Can methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets be taken with other medicines?Tell your doctor about all of the medicines that you or your child takes including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets and some medicines may interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Sometimes the doses of other medicines will need to be adjusted while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Your doctor will decide whether methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets can be taken with other medicines. Especially tell your doctor if you or your child takes:antidepression medicines including MAOIs seizure medicines blood thinner medicines blood pressure medicines cold or allergy medicines that contain decongestants Know the medicines that you or your child takes. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start any new medicine while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets without talking to your doctor first.How should methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets be taken?Take methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets exactly as prescribed. Your doctor may adjust the dose until it is right for you or your child. Do not chew, crush, or divide the tablets. Swallow methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets whole with water or other liquids. Tell your doctor if you or your child cannot swallow methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets whole. A different medicine may need to be prescribed. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets can be taken with or without food. Take methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets once each day in the morning. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets are an extended-release tablet. It releases medication into your or your child's body throughout the day. The methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablet does not dissolve completely in the body after all the medicine has been released. You or your child may sometimes notice the empty tablet in a bowel movement. This is normal. From time to time, your doctor may stop methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets treatment for a while to check ADHD symptoms. Your doctor may do regular checks of the blood, heart, and blood pressure while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Children should have their height and weight checked often while taking methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. Methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets treatment may be stopped if a problem is found during these check-ups. If you or your child takes too many methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets or overdoses, call your doctor or poison control center right away, or get emergency treatment.What are possible side effects of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets? See “What is the most important information I should know about methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets?” for information on reported heart and mental problems. Other serious side effects include:slowing of growth (height and weight) in children seizures, mainly in patients with a history of seizures eyesight changes or blurred vision blockage of the esophagus, stomach, small or large intestine in patients who already have a narrowing in any of these organs Common side effects include:decreased appetite dry mouth trouble sleeping dizziness stomach ache increased sweating headache nausea anxiety weight loss irritability Stimulants may impair the ability of you or your child to operate potentially hazardous machinery or vehicles. You or your child should exercise caution until you or your child is reasonably certain that methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets does not adversely affect your or your child's ability to engage in such activities. Talk to your doctor if you or your child has side effects that are bothersome or do not go away. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.You may also report side effects to Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. at 1-888-838-2872.How should I store methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets?Store methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets in a safe place at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from moisture. Keep methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets and all medicines out of the reach of children.General information about methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tabletsMedicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets to other people, even if they have the same condition. It may harm them and it is against the law. This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets. If you would like more information, talk with your doctor. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist for information about methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets that was written for healthcare professionals. For more information about methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets call Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. at 1-888-838-2872. What are the ingredients in methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release tablets?Active Ingredient: methylphenidate hydrochloride, USPInactive Ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, fumaric acid, hypromellose 2208, hypromellose 2910, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer Type A, methacrylic acid copolymer Type B, talc, titanium dioxide, and triethyl citrate. The 18 mg strength also contains iron oxide red, iron oxide yellow, polyethylene glycol 3350, and polyvinyl alcohol. The 27 mg strength also contains FD&C Blue #2/Indigo Carmine Aluminum Lake, iron oxide black, iron oxide yellow, polyethylene glycol 3350, and polyvinyl alcohol. The 36 mg strength also contains triacetin. The 54 mg strength also contains iron oxide red, polyethylene glycol 3350, and polyvinyl alcohol. The imprinting ink contains ammonium hydroxide, iron oxide black, propylene glycol, and shellac.This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc.North Wales, PA 19454Iss. 09/2018

* Please review the disclaimer below.

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