NDC 69076-611 Riluzole

Riluzole

NDC Product Code 69076-611

NDC Code: 69076-611

Proprietary Name: Riluzole Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Proprietary Name?
The proprietary name also known as the trade name is the name of the product chosen by the medication labeler for marketing purposes.

Non-Proprietary Name: Riluzole Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Non-Proprietary Name?
The non-proprietary name is sometimes called the generic name. The generic name usually includes the active ingredient(s) of the product.


Product Characteristics
Color(s):
YELLOW (C48330 - PALE)
Shape: OVAL (C48345)
Size(s):
10 MM
Imprint(s):
611
Score: 1

Code Structure
  • 69076 - Quinn Pharmaceuticals, Llc
    • 69076-611 - Riluzole

NDC 69076-611-60

Package Description: 60 TABLET in 1 BOTTLE

NDC Product Information

Riluzole with NDC 69076-611 is a a human prescription drug product labeled by Quinn Pharmaceuticals, Llc. The generic name of Riluzole is riluzole. The product's dosage form is tablet and is administered via oral form.

Labeler Name: Quinn Pharmaceuticals, Llc

Dosage Form: Tablet - A solid dosage form containing medicinal substances with or without suitable diluents.

Product Type: Human Prescription Drug Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat kind of product is this?
Indicates the type of product, such as Human Prescription Drug or Human Over the Counter Drug. This data element matches the “Document Type” field of the Structured Product Listing.


Riluzole Active Ingredient(s)

Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Active Ingredient(s) List?
This is the active ingredient list. Each ingredient name is the preferred term of the UNII code submitted.

  • RILUZOLE 50 mg/1

Inactive Ingredient(s)

Additional informationCallout TooltipAbout the Inactive Ingredient(s)
The inactive ingredients are all the component of a medicinal product OTHER than the active ingredient(s). The acronym "UNII" stands for “Unique Ingredient Identifier” and is used to identify each inactive ingredient present in a product.

  • ANHYDROUS DIBASIC CALCIUM PHOSPHATE (UNII: L11K75P92J)
  • SILICON DIOXIDE (UNII: ETJ7Z6XBU4)
  • CROSCARMELLOSE SODIUM (UNII: M28OL1HH48)
  • HYPROMELLOSE, UNSPECIFIED (UNII: 3NXW29V3WO)
  • MAGNESIUM STEARATE (UNII: 70097M6I30)
  • MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE (UNII: OP1R32D61U)
  • POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL, UNSPECIFIED (UNII: 3WJQ0SDW1A)
  • TITANIUM DIOXIDE (UNII: 15FIX9V2JP)
  • FERRIC OXIDE YELLOW (UNII: EX438O2MRT)

Administration Route(s)

Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat are the Administration Route(s)?
The translation of the route code submitted by the firm, indicating route of administration.

  • Oral - Administration to or by way of the mouth.

Pharmacological Class(es)

Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is a Pharmacological Class?
These are the reported pharmacological class categories corresponding to the SubstanceNames listed above.

  • Benzothiazole - [EPC] (Established Pharmacologic Class)
  • Benzothiazoles - [CS]

Product Labeler Information

Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Labeler Name?
Name of Company corresponding to the labeler code segment of the Product NDC.

Labeler Name: Quinn Pharmaceuticals, Llc
Labeler Code: 69076
FDA Application Number: ANDA204430 Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the FDA Application Number?
This corresponds to the NDA, ANDA, or BLA number reported by the labeler for products which have the corresponding Marketing Category designated. If the designated Marketing Category is OTC Monograph Final or OTC Monograph Not Final, then the Application number will be the CFR citation corresponding to the appropriate Monograph (e.g. “part 341”). For unapproved drugs, this field will be null.

Marketing Category: ANDA - A product marketed under an approved Abbreviated New Drug Application. Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Marketing Category?
Product types are broken down into several potential Marketing Categories, such as NDA/ANDA/BLA, OTC Monograph, or Unapproved Drug. One and only one Marketing Category may be chosen for a product, not all marketing categories are available to all product types. Currently, only final marketed product categories are included. The complete list of codes and translations can be found at www.fda.gov/edrls under Structured Product Labeling Resources.

Start Marketing Date: 01-14-2019 Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Start Marketing Date?
This is the date that the labeler indicates was the start of its marketing of the drug product.

Listing Expiration Date: 12-31-2019 Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the Listing Expiration Date?
This is the date when the listing record will expire if not updated or certified by the product labeler.

Exclude Flag: N Additional informationCallout TooltipWhat is the NDC Exclude Flag?
This field indicates whether the product has been removed/excluded from the NDC Directory for failure to respond to FDA’s requests for correction to deficient or non-compliant submissions. Values = ‘Y’ or ‘N’.

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Information for Patients

Riluzole

Riluzole is pronounced as (ril' yoo zole)

Why is riluzole medication prescribed?
Riluzole is used to slow the progress of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). The drug also may delay the need for a tracheostomy (breathing tube)...
[Read More]

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Riluzole Product Label Images

Riluzole Product Labeling Information

The product labeling information includes all published material associated to a drug. Product labeling documents include information like generic names, active ingredients, ingredient strength dosage, routes of administration, appearance, usage, warnings, inactive ingredients, etc.

Product Labeling Index

1 Indications And Usage

Riluzole tablets, USP is indicated for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

2 Dosage And Administration

The recommended dosage for riluzole tablets is 50 mg taken orally twice daily. Riluzole tablets should be taken at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].Measure serum aminotransferases before and during treatment with riluzole tablets [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

3 Dosage Forms And Strengths

Tablets: 50 mg film-coated, capsule-shaped, pale yellow, with “611” on one side.

4 Contraindications

Riluzole tablets is contraindicated in patients with a history of severe hypersensitivity reactions to riluzole or to any of its components (anaphylaxis has occurred) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

5.1 Hepatic Injury

Cases of drug-induced liver injury, some of which were fatal, have been reported in patients taking riluzole tablets. Asymptomatic elevations of hepatic transaminases have also been reported, and in some patients have recurred upon rechallenge with riluzole tablets.In clinical studies, the incidence of elevations in hepatic transaminases was greater in riluzole-treated patients than placebo-treated patients. The incidence of elevations of ALT above 5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) was 2% in riluzole-treated patients. Maximum increases in ALT occurred within 3 months after starting riluzole tablets. About 50% and 8% of riluzole-treated patients in pooled Studies 1 and 2, had at least one elevated ALT level above ULN and above 3 times ULN, respectively [see Clinical Studies (14)].Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of hepatic injury, every month for the first 3 months of treatment, and periodically thereafter. The use of riluzole tablets is not recommended if patients develop hepatic transaminases levels greater than 5 times the ULN. Discontinue riluzole tablets if there is evidence of liver dysfunction (e.g., elevated bilirubin).

5.2 Neutropenia

Cases of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count less than 500 per mm3) within the first 2 months of riluzole treatment have been reported. Advise patients to report febrile illnesses.

5.3 Interstitial Lung Disease

Interstitial lung disease, including hypersensitivity pneumonitis, has occurred in patients taking riluzole tablets. Discontinue riluzole tablets immediately if interstitial lung disease develops.

6 Adverse Reactions

  • The following adverse reactions are described below and elsewhere in the labeling: •Hepatic Injury [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Neutropenia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Interstitial lung disease [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.Adverse Reactions in Controlled Clinical TrialsIn the placebo-controlled clinical trials in patients with ALS (Study 1 and 2), a total of 313 patients received riluzole tablets 50 mg twice daily [see Clinical Studies (14)]. The most common adverse reactions in the riluzole group (in at least 5% of patients and more frequently than in the placebo group) were asthenia, nausea, dizziness, decreased lung function, and abdominal pain. The most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation in the riluzole group were nausea, abdominal pain, constipation, and elevated ALT.There was no difference in rates of adverse reactions leading to discontinuation in females and males. However, the incidence of dizziness was higher in females (11%) than in males (4%). The adverse reaction profile was similar in older and younger patients. There were insufficient data to determine if there were differences in the adverse reaction profile in different races.Table 1 lists adverse reactions that occurred in at least 2% of riluzole-treated patients (50 mg twice daily) in pooled Study 1 and 2, and at a higher rate than placebo.Table 1. Adverse Reactions in Pooled Placebo-Controlled Trials (Studies 1 and 2) in Patients with ALSRiluzoleTablets50 mg twice daily(N=313)Placebo(N=320)Asthenia19%12%Nausea16%11%Decreased lung function10%9%Hypertension5%4%Abdominal pain5%4%Vomiting4%2%Arthralgia4%3%Dizziness4%3%Dry mouth4%3%Insomnia4%3%Pruritus4%3%Tachycardia3%1%Flatulence3%2%Increased cough3%2%Peripheral edema3%2%Urinary Tract Infection3%2%Circumoral paresthesia2%0%Somnolence2%1%Vertigo2%1%Eczema2%1%

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

  • The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of riluzole tablets. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. •Acute hepatitis and icteric toxic hepatitis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Renal tubular impairment

7.1 Agents That May Increase Riluzole Blood Concentrations

CYP1A2 inhibitorsCo-administration of riluzole (a CYP1A substrate) with CYP1A2 inhibitors was not evaluated in a clinical trial; however, in vitro findings suggest an increase in riluzole exposure is likely. The concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP1A2 inhibitors (e.g., ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fluvoxamine, methoxsalen, mexiletine, oral contraceptives, thiabendazole, vemurafenib, zileuton) with riluzole may increase the risk of riluzole-associated adverse reactions [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.2 Agents That May Decrease Riluzole Plasma Concentrations

CYP1A2 inducersCo-administration of riluzole (a CYP1A substrate) with CYP1A2 inducers was not evaluated in a clinical trial; however, in vitro findings suggest a decrease in riluzole exposure is likely. Lower exposures may result in decreased efficacy [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.3 Hepatotoxic Drugs

Clinical trials in ALS patients excluded patients on concomitant medications which were potentially hepatotoxic (e.g., allopurinol, methyldopa, sulfasalazine). Riluzole-treated patients who take other hepatotoxic drugs may be at an increased risk for hepatotoxicity [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

Risk Summary

There are no studies of riluzole in pregnant women, and case reports have been inadequate to inform the drug-associated risk. The background risk for major birth defects and miscarriage in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively.In studies in which riluzole was administered orally to pregnant animals, developmental toxicity (decreased embryofetal/offspring viability, growth, and functional development) was observed at clinically relevant doses [see Data]. Based on these results, women should be advised of a possible risk to the fetus associated with use of riluzole during pregnancy.

It is not known if riluzole is excreted in human milk. Riluzole or its metabolites have been detected in milk of lactating rat. Women should be advised that many drugs are excreted in human milk and that the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from riluzole is unknown.

Data

Animal DataOral administration of riluzole (3, 9, or 27 mg/kg/day) to pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis resulted in decreases in fetal growth (body weight and length) at the high dose. The mid dose, a no-effect dose for embryofetal developmental toxicity, is approximately equal to the recommended human daily dose (RHDD, 100 mg) on a mg/m2 basis. When riluzole was administered orally (3, 10, or 60 mg/kg/day) to pregnant rabbits during the period of organogenesis, embryofetal mortality was increased at the high dose and fetal body weight was decreased and morphological variations increased at all but the lowest dose tested. The no-effect dose (3 mg/kg/day) for embryofetal developmental toxicity is less than the RHDD on a mg/m2 basis. Maternal toxicity was observed at the highest dose tested in rat and rabbit. When riluzole was orally administered (3, 8, or 15 mg/kg/day) to male and female rats prior to and during mating and to female rats throughout gestation and lactation, increased embryofetal mortality and decreased postnatal offspring viability, growth, and functional development were observed at the high dose. The mid dose, a no-effect dose for pre- and postnatal developmental toxicity, is approximately equal to the RHDD on a mg/m2 basis.

8.3 Females And Males Of Reproductive Potential

In rats, oral administration of riluzole resulted in decreased fertility indices and increases in embryolethality [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness of riluzole tablets in pediatric patients have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

In clinical studies of riluzole tablets, 30% of patients were 65 years and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

8.6 Hepatic Impairment

Patients with mild [Child-Pugh's (CP) score A] or moderate (CP score B) hepatic impairment had increases in AUC compared to patients with normal hepatic function. Thus, patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment may be at increased risk of adverse reactions. The impact of severe hepatic impairment on riluzole exposure is unknown. Use of riluzole tablets is not recommended in patients with baseline elevations of serum aminotransferases greater than 5 times upper limit of normal or evidence of liver dysfunction (e.g., elevated bilirubin) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.7 Japanese Patients

Japanese patients are more likely to have higher riluzole concentrations. Consequently, the risk of adverse reactions may be greater in Japanese patients [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

10 Overdosage

Reported symptoms of overdose following ingestion of riluzole ranging from 1.5 to 3 grams (30 to 60 times the recommended dose) included acute toxic encephalopathy, coma, drowsiness, memory loss, and methemoglobinemia.No specific antidote for the treatment of riluzole overdose is available. For current information on the management of poisoning or overdosage, contact the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 or www.poison.org.

11 Description

Riluzole tablets, USP is a member of the benzothiazole class. The chemical designation for riluzole is 2-amino-6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzothiazole. Its molecular formula is C8H5F3N2OS, and its molecular weight is 234.2. The chemical structure is:Riluzole is a white to slightly yellow powder that is very soluble in dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide, and methanol; freely soluble in dichloromethane; sparingly soluble in 0.1 N HCl; and very slightly soluble in water and in 0.1 N NaOH.Each film-coated tablet for oral use contains 50 mg of riluzole and the following inactive ingredients: anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate, colloidal silicon dioxide, croscarmellose sodium, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, titanium dioxide, and yellow ferric oxide.

12.1 Mechanism Of Action

The mechanism by which riluzole exerts its therapeutic effects in patients with ALS is unknown.

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

The clinical pharmacodynamics of riluzole has not been determined in humans.

12.3 Pharmacokinetics

Table 2 displays the pharmacokinetic parameters of riluzole.Table 2. Pharmacokinetic Parameters of RiluzoleAbsorption   Bioavailability (oral)Approximately 60%   Dose ProportionalityLinear over a dose range of 25 mg to 100 mg every 12 hours (1/2 to 2 times the recommended dosage)   Food effectAUC ↓ 20% and Cmax ↓ 45% (high fat meal)Distribution   Plasma Protein Binding96% (Mainly to albumin and lipoproteins)Elimination   Elimination half-life•  12 hours (CV=35%)•  The high interindividual variability in the clearance of riluzole is potentially attributable to variability of CYP1A2. The clinical implications are not known.   AccumulationApproximately 2-foldMetabolism   Fraction metabolized (% dose)At least 88%   Primary metabolic pathway(s) [in vitro]•  Oxidation: CYP1A2•  Direct and sequential glucoronidation: UGT-HP4   Active MetabolitesSome metabolites appear pharmacologically active in vitro, but the clinical implications are not known.Excretion   Primary elimination pathways (% dose)•  Feces: 5%•  Urine: 90% (2% unchanged riluzole)Specific PopulationsHepatic ImpairmentCompared with healthy volunteers, the AUC of riluzole was approximately 1.7-fold greater in patients with mild chronic hepatic impairment (CP score A) and approximately 3-fold greater in patients with moderate chronic hepatic impairment (CP score B). The pharmacokinetics of riluzole have not been studied in patients with severe hepatic impairment (CP score C) [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)].RaceThe clearance of riluzole was 50% lower in male Japanese subjects than in Caucasian subjects, after normalizing for body weight [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7)].GenderThe mean AUC of riluzole was approximately 45% higher in female patients than male patients.SmokersThe clearance of riluzole in tobacco smokers was 20% greater than in nonsmokers. Geriatric Patients and Patients with Moderate to Severe Renal ImpairmentAge 65 years or older, and moderate to severe renal impairment do not have a meaningful effect on the pharmacokinetics of riluzole. The pharmacokinetics of riluzole in patients undergoing hemodialysis are unknown.Drug Interaction StudiesDrugs Highly Bound To Plasma ProteinsRiluzole and warfarin are highly bound to plasma proteins. In vitro, riluzole did not show any displacement of warfarin from plasma proteins. Riluzole binding to plasma proteins was unaffected by warfarin, digoxin, imipramine and quinine at high therapeutic concentrations in vitro.

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility

CarcinogenesisRiluzole was not carcinogenic in mice or rats when administered for 2 years at daily oral doses up to 20 and 10 mg/kg/day, respectively, which are approximately equal to the recommended human daily dose (RHDD, 100 mg) on a mg/m2 basis.Mutagenesis Riluzole was negative in in vitro (bacterial reverse mutation (Ames), mouse lymphoma tk, chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes), and in vivo (rat cytogenetic and mouse micronucleus) assays.N-hydroxyriluzole, the major active metabolite of riluzole, was positive for clastogenicity in the in vitro mouse lymphoma tk assay and in the in vitro micronucleus assay using the same mouse lymphoma cell line. N-hydroxyriluzole was negative in the HPRT gene mutation assay, the Ames assay (with and without rat or hamster S9), the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, and the in vivo mouse micronucleus assay.Impairment of Fertility When riluzole (3, 8, or 15 mg/kg) was administered orally to male and female rats prior to and during mating and continuing in females throughout gestation and lactation, fertility indices were decreased and embryolethality was increased at the high dose. This dose was also associated with maternal toxicity. The mid dose, a no-effect dose for effects on fertility and early embryonic development, is approximately equal to the RHDD on a mg/m2 basis.

14 Clinical Studies

The efficacy of riluzole tablets was demonstrated in two studies (Study 1 and 2) that evaluated riluzole tablets 50 mg twice daily in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Both studies included patients with either familial or sporadic ALS, a disease duration of less than 5 years, and a baseline forced vital capacity greater than or equal to 60% of normal.Study 1 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study that enrolled 155 patients with ALS. Patients were randomized to receive riluzole 50 mg twice daily (n=77) or placebo (n=78) and were followed for at least 13 months (up to a maximum duration of 18 months). The clinical outcome measure was time to tracheostomy or death. The time to tracheostomy or death was longer for patients receiving riluzole compared to placebo. There was an early increase in survival in patients receiving riluzole compared to placebo. Figure 1 displays the survival curves for time to death or tracheostomy. The vertical axis represents the proportion of individuals alive without tracheostomy at various times following treatment initiation (horizontal axis). Although these survival curves were not statistically significantly different when evaluated by the analysis specified in the study protocol (Logrank test p=0.12), the difference was found to be significant by another appropriate analysis (Wilcoxon test p=0.05). As seen in Figure 1, the study showed an early increase in survival in patients given riluzole. Among the patients in whom the endpoint of tracheostomy or death was reached during the study, the difference in median survival between the riluzole 50 mg twice daily and placebo groups was approximately 90 days.Figure 1. Time to Tracheostomy or Death in ALS Patients in Study 1 (Kaplan-Meier Curves)Study 2 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study that enrolled 959 patients with ALS. Patients were randomized to riluzole 50 mg twice daily (n=236) or placebo (n=242) and were followed for at least 12 months (up to a maximum duration of 18 months). The clinical outcome measure was time to tracheostomy or death. The time to tracheostomy or death was longer for patients receiving riluzole compared to placebo. Figure 2 displays the survival curves for time to death or tracheostomy for patients randomized to either riluzole 100 mg per day or placebo. Although these survival curves were not statistically significantly different when evaluated by the analysis specified in the study protocol (Logrank test p=0.076), the difference was found to be significant by another appropriate analysis (Wilcoxon test p=0.05). Not displayed in Figure 2 are the results of riluzole 50 mg per day (one-half of the recommended daily dose), which could not be statistically distinguished from placebo, or the results of riluzole 200 mg per day (two times the recommended daily dose), which were not distinguishable from the 100 mg per day results. Among the patients in whom the endpoint of tracheostomy or death was reached during the study, the difference in median survival between riluzole and placebo was approximately 60 days.Although riluzole improved survival in both studies, measures of muscle strength and neurological function did not show a benefit.Figure 2. Time to Tracheostomy or Death in ALS Patients in Study 2 (Kaplan-Meier Curves)

16 How Supplied/Storage And Handling

Riluzole tablets, USP 50 mg is pale yellow, capsule-shaped, film-coated, and engraved with “611” on one side. Riluzole tablets, USP 50 mg is supplied in bottles of 60 tablets, NDC 69076-611-60.Store at controlled room temperature, 20°C to 25°C (68°F to 77°F), and protect from bright light.

17 Patient Counseling Information

  • Advise patients to inform their healthcare provider if they experience: •Yellowing of the whites of the eyes [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Fever [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Respiratory symptoms—for example, dry cough and difficult or labored breathing [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]Made in JapanManufactured for:Quinn Pharmaceuticals, LLCCoral Springs, FL844-477-8466

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